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Summary: In the past, camelina was used mainly in food production. However, the species also has numerous industrial applications. The aim of this study was to determine the agronomic performance (seed, straw and oil yield) and the qualitative parameters (oil and protein content, fatty acid composition) of 10 spring camelina genotypes. The experiment was conducted from 2015 to 2018 in north-eastern Poland. The phenological phases, seed and biomass yield, and the composition of spring camelina seeds, including oil and protein content and fatty acid composition, were determined. Three main genotype...

Summary: Camelina sativa has attracted much interest as alternative renewable resources for biodiesel, other oil-based industrial products and a source for edible oils. Its unique oil attributes attract research to engineering new varieties of improved oil quantity and quality. We conclude that TAG production is limited by (1) utilization of fixed carbon from the source tissues supported by the increase in glycolysis pathway metabolites and decreased transcripts levels of transcription factors controlling fatty acids synthesis; (2) TAG accumulation is limited by the activity of lipases/hydrolases that hydrolyze TAG pool supported...

Summary: Pseudomonas resinovorans was used for direct fermentation of Camelina oil without prior hydrolysis. A first approach to process development in bioreactor has provided up to 40% (w w-1) polymer content, matching highest medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates titer reported from plant oils (13.2 g l-1). Camelina oil was shown to be a suitable substrate for production of medium-chain-length polyhydroxyalkanoates. This non-food vegetable oil gave good results for Pseudomonas resinovorans DSM 21078 without any pre-treatment.Link: http://journals.sbmu.ac.ir/afb/article/view/21635

Summary: To overcome the drawbacks of synthetic films in food packaging industry, researchers are turned to natural bio-based edible films enriched with various plant additives. In the current study chitosan blend films were produced by incorporating Camelina sativa seed oil at varying concentrations to chitosan matrix. The chitosan blend films were characterized both physicochemically and biologically. The incorporation of C. sativa seed oil notably enhanced thermal stability, antioxidative, anti-quorum sensing and antimicrobial activity. This study provides valuable information for C. sativa seed oil to be used as a blending ingredient...

Summary: Modified fatty acids (mFA) have diverse uses, e.g., cyclopropane fatty acids (CPA) are feedstocks for producing coatings, lubricants, plastics, and cosmetics. The expression of mFA-producing enzymes in crop and model plants generally results in lower levels of mFA accumulation than in their natural-occurring source plants. To further our understanding of metabolic bottlenecks that limit mFA accumulation, we generated transgenic ...
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Carbodiimide stabilizes the ultrasound-pretreated camelina protein structure with improved water resistance – Xiangwei Zhua, Donghai Wangb, Xiuzhi Susan Sun – Industrial Crops and Products 2016 Summary: Camelina protein showed poor water resistance, which restrained its industrial application, such as for adhesives or coatings. In this research, the effect of ultrasound pretreatment and carbodiimide coupling on water resistance of camelina protein ...
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Summary: The alcoholysis of crambe and camelina oils was carried out with oleyl alcohol, alcohols derived from crambe and camelina oils, and n-octanol using potassium hydroxide as catalyst to prepare alkyl esters. Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11746-000-0060-2

Summary: Crambe and camelina oil were transesterified with oleyl alcohol, the alcohols derived from crambe and camelina oils, n-octanol or isopropanol using Novozym 435 (immobilized lipase B from Candida antarctica), Lipozyme IM (immobilized lipase from Rhizomucor miehei), and papaya (Carica papaya) latex lipase as biocatalysts. Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11746-000-0059-8

Summary: Fatty acids obtained from seed oils of crambe (Crambe abyssinica) and camelina (Camelina sativa) via alkaline saponification or steam splitting were esterified using lipases as biocatalysts with oleyl alcohol and the alcohols derived from crambe and camelina oils via hydrogenolysis of their methyl esters. Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11262006

Summary: Biodiesel derived from camelina as well as other feedstocks including palm, mustard, coconut, sunflower, soybean and canola were prepared via the conventional base-catalyzed transesterification with methanol. Fatty acid profiles and the fuel properties of biodiesel from these different vegetable oils were analyzed and tested in accordance with ASTM D6751. Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11746-011-1970-1